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Do you have an exit seeking resident?

 

Bill was a dairy farmer and spent his entire life outside. He was up before sunrise milking cows before the birds had even started chirping.  Every evening, he was out milking again. His entire life was set by the rhythm of farm life.

 

 

Bill now resides in your long term care home in your secure unit since he is adamant he needs to get outside and milk the cows. With his advanced dementia, he does not realize that he hasn’t milked the cows in nearly 25 years, but his circadian rhythm is indelibly marked by the farm rhythm and he’s bound and determined to get outside.

 

Of course, Bill is safe on your secure floor and he cannot leave.  But as dusk arrives, Bill becomes increasingly agitated as he feels the need to be out on the farm, and his agitation is contagious.  He paces the floor back and forth, he looks out each window longingly and he searches for the exit. Other residents can sense his unease and though they don’t know what he’s anxious about, they share the sentiment.

 

The approaching evening as the sun is setting can be a challenging enough time within long term care as many residents have competing needs at that time of day.  Bill’s increasing agitation only compounds those needs.

 

 

What Bill really needs is a dedicated caregiver companion who can address his personal needs.  A caregiver can take Bill on safe outings, fulfilling his desire to be outside. When evening approaches Bill’s caregiver can reassure him “not to worry, you milked the cows a little early today; everything is fine on the farm.” 

 

His caregiver can keep Bill occupied so that he doesn’t start looking for something to do—his history dictates that if he had a moment of boredom, he cured it by heading out to the barn. Instead of letting Bill feel bored—and likely to want to exit seek—his dedicated caregiver can keep Bill engaged in conversation and activities until dinner time when he typically settles into a routine.

 

 

Of course, Bill receives the most direct positive impact from his caregiver, but the incredible part is that he is not the only recipient!  Other residents also benefit when Bill is calm and redirected. The source of the anxiousness and agitation that spread contagiously is solved.  By extension, staff benefit when residents are content and happy.  Bill’s caregiver addresses his emotional need, which frees staff to care for other residents who may be in need.

 

When you have a resident who is intent on leaving the secure floor, remember that one of the most effective strategies may be a dedicated caregiver who can address emotional needs and redirect attention.  The positive impact will have a ripple effect across the entire floor!

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