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Always Respect Their Personal Space

 

Have you ever been to visit someone in long term care, and they told you to “get out!” of their room?  Or perhaps you’ve been visiting someone and you’ve overheard another resident angrily throw someone out of their room.

 

It’s not uncommon, but visitors are often shocked by it.

 

 

Why is it that someone in long term care might yell “get out” to a visitor, a care provider, staff or another resident? To better understand the reaction, let’s step back a little and think about human nature on a larger scale.

 

As humans, we have an instinct to seek shelter and collect items we might need to keep us safe or fed in the future. Most of us have had the benefit of living in a home, apartment or condo throughout our lives, and we made that space into our own personal haven. Think about the layout of your home or apartment. Which rooms do you invite visitors into?

 

Likely, you have visitors in the living room and the kitchen, maybe the family room or den.  For decades throughout your life, you entertain in these rooms. How many visitors do you invite into your bedroom?  Likely, not very many!

 

Throughout your life, you have likely associated your bedroom with deeply personal and deeply vulnerable activities. Human beings are most vulnerable when we’re sleeping, and most of us associate bedrooms with sleeping. It may also be the room where you change your clothes, which is also a moment of vulnerability.

 

So for decades of your life, your bedroom has remained off-limits to all but the very closest people in your lives. No one entered your bedroom without express permission. You had an expectation of complete privacy, safety and security in your bedroom.

 

Now think back to that resident who has just moved into long term care.  Possibly for the first time in her life, that woman now has only one small room to herself. That room is where she sleeps and where she changes. The only washroom she uses is within that one room. Her most vulnerable and intimate personal care all happens within that space.

 

A room that has been private and personal and by-invitation-only her entire life, now has strangers entering it. Care providers, staff, fellow residents seeking their own rooms, lost visitors—any of these people may enter her most intimate, private space without warning.

 

No wonder she might cry out!  No wonder it might cause distress!  For eighty years this woman has had an expectation of privacy in her bedroom and suddenly a stranger waltzes in her room. If this same woman has dementia, she may not remember that she has moved; she may not remember that the “intruder” is the same care worker who served her yesterday. It may continue to be an intrusion for quite some time.

 

What can you do?

 

Whenever you are visiting someone in long term care, be sure that you always ask permission to enter their room.  Think about how you would feel if someone entered your bedroom unannounced; be sure you don’t cause that distress for someone with dementia.

 

 

Announce who you are and how you are connected to them, and then ask permission to join them in their room.  Respect the fact that some residents prefer to socialize outside their room in the open common areas, and other residents prefer the privacy and comfort of their room. Ask the resident what he or she prefers, and remember how personal their room maybe for them.

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